Tagged: Oakland Athletics

Can’t Stand Up For Falling Down

  • Getting over the .500 mark is just too damn hard

Once again, a starter pitched well enough to get the win, and once again, it was all in vain.  Of course, this time Nick Blackburn screwed himself out of the “W” when he surrendered three runs in the bottom of the eighth (with a little help from Michael Cuddyer), allowing Oakland to tie the game.  Sean Henn and Matt Guerrier then conspired to give up the winning run in the bottom of the ninth.  Had they managed to close out this game, The Twins would have reached the .500 mark for the first time in nearly a month.  Instead, the Twinks have fallen to 30-32 and are currently trailing the division-leading Tigers by four games.  Oh, and their league-worst road record is now 9-20.  Not good.

The bats weren’t exactly hot this afternoon, but the Twins did jump out to an early lead thanks to a three-run homer by Joe Crede.  Gosh, that signing is looking better and better every day.  Even though Crede’s batting average is a paltry .233, he’s clubbed seven homers in just 81 at-bats and now has ten already on the year.  He has been a tad on the injury-prone side (to say the least), but at least his back hasn’t been much of an issue so far (*knocks on wood*).  Of course, the organization is probably just trying to protect its investment, so they’ll likely keep him out of the lineup if he isn’t exactly 100%.

Joe Mauer went 1-for-4 and his batting average has now dropped to .410, and is in danger of not being the first player since Ted Williams to hit over .400 in a season.  STUPID CHEAP TWINS WHY DIDNT U TAKE MARK PRIOR INSTEAD!!!1!!1!   

Not surprisingly, Alexi Casilla was sent back down after Nick Punto was activated from the DL earlier this afternoon.  Casilla made a few unfortunate misplays that nearly cost the Twins in Tuesday night’s game, but for the most part he hasn’t been that bad since being recalled from Rochester.  He’s been hitting .308/.357/.385, which is a vast improvement over the .167/.202/.231 he was batting before his first demotion.  However, Matt Tolbert is more versatile, and Nick Punto obviously isn’t going anywhere with that $8.5 million albatross of a contract he signed in the offseason, so Casilla was sort of the odd man out of the infield.  Still, I would rather the Twins send Brian Buscher down instead, since he’s a liability both offensively and defensively and is seldom used anyway (he’s played in all of 32 games this season).

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Why is there this tingling in my left arm?

  • Twins survive ninth-inning nightmare to beat Oakland 10-5

HomerHA.jpgThis game was much, much closer than the final score would indicate.  The Twins had a 10-0 lead going into the ninth.  Scott Baker had pitched brilliantly, holding the A’s two just two hits in eight innings, and since he’d thrown only 96 pitches, was going for a complete game.  And that’s when things got a lot more interesting than they really needed to be.  Baker was obviously gassed, and loaded up the bases without recording an out (although he didn’t get any help from Alexi Casilla, more on that in a minute).  Jesse Crain was brought in to relieve Scotty, but ran into trouble of his own.  After Alexi Casilla again failed to field a routine ground ball that allowed a pair of runs to score, Crain had trouble finding the strike zone.  He walked Jack Cust with the bases loaded, and was yanked in favor of Jose Mijares.  Mijares struck out Jason Giambi, but then suffered some control issues of his own.  He walked the next two batters and forced in a pair of runs.  With the score now 10-5, and the bases loaded with only one out, Joe Nathan was brought in to complete what had suddenly become a save situation.  He struck out Jack Hannahan and Rajai Davis to end the threat and pick up his 12th save of the year. 

I’ll admit that I was nervous before Nathan came in.  If there’s any team that can screw up a 10-0 lead in the ninth inning, it is the Twins.  They’ve had such awful luck on the road this season and it really wouldn’t have surprised me if they ended up losing 11-10.  Besides, it’s not like this kind of thing has never happened before.

The horrorshow that unfolded in the ninth overshadowed what had been a rare quality road win.  Not only did Baker pitch a gem, but the bats sprang to life and gave him some much-needed run support.  Delmon Young, who’s really been having a rough season both on and off the field, went 2-for-4 with a double (his first extra-base hit since April 22) and three RBI.  Justin Morneau made me look silly for suggesting he might be in a slump, going 4-for-5 with a solo home run.  Jason Kubel hit a three-run homer.  Brendan Harris, who saw his career-high 12 game hitting streak come to an end on Monday night, went 3-for-4 with a walk and a run scored.  Even Carlos Gomez, who was put in the leadoff spot when Denard Span was forced to leave the game, came up with a big two-run double (though he also struck out twice).  It’s a good thing too, because the Twins needed every single one of those runs to hold off the A’s and get the win.

  • Bert Blyleven is an a**

OK, here comes a mini-rant.  I’m not really a fan of the Twins’ broadcast team, but I don’t usually complain about them here because it’s a waste of time.  The Twins aren’t going to fire Bert and Dick simply because I don’t like them, and rehashing ad nauseum all the dumb things they say is enough to give me a headache.  And since most of my readers don’t have to listen to Dick and Bert, they’d probably have no idea what I’m talking about, anyway.  But when Blyleven called out Scott Baker during the broadcast for failing to pitch a complete game, I felt I needed to make an exception.  It wouldn’t have been so bad, but he made it sound like the ninth-inning collapse was all Scotty’s fault, and it wasn’t (Alexi Casilla had a lot to do with it, but I’ll get to that).  Baker was on his game all night: he struck out eight batters, didn’t walk anyone, and allowed only one extra-base hit.  He retired fourteen straight batters coming into the ninth inning, and considering how much Baker has struggled this season, his performance had already exceeded expectations.  The complete game would simply have been icing on the cake.  But Bert ripped into Scotty when he loaded the bases without recording an out (again, not really his fault), accusing him of lacking the mettle to pitch a complete game.  Ridiculous.  If Baker truly wasn’t interested in trying to finish the game, then what the hell was he doing out there in the first place?  It was obvious that he was exhausted, and one would think that if Baker didn’t care about finishing the game himself, he would’ve simply told Gardy that he was done for the night.  Scotty didn’t deserve the public tongue-lashing Bert doled out from the safety of the broadcast booth, not after pitching eight innings of two-hit ball.  And it will never happen, but Bert owes Scotty an on-air apology.  Maybe I should change the title of this blog to “Fire Bert Blyleven”.

Worse yet, there was little rage directed at the true goat of the game:  Alexi Casilla.  The second baseman booted a couple of routine ground balls, one of which might have been a double-play. If Alexi even made one of those plays, Baker likely would’ve escaped the ninth having pitched a three-hit, maybe one-run complete game.  But because of Casilla’s incompetence, Baker had to settle for eight innings and three unearned earned runs.  And the Twins had to use their closer to save what should have been a complete blowout (of course, Jesse Crain and Jose Mijares could’ve pitched better, too).  Ugh, I never thought I’d be so happy to hear that Nick Punto is coming back soon.  I will take a sub-.200 middle-infielder who can make routine plays over a sub-.200 middle-infielder who can’t any day.
        

Back to the Farm With You, Young Man

  • Oakland chases out Anthony Swarzak after only 3.2 innings

Things got off to a really good start for the Twins in Oakland.  They jumped out to a three-run lead early in the ballgame, with some timely hitting from the bottom of the order (and a bases-loaded, two-out walk by none other than Carlos Gomez).  It looked as though the Twins were finally starting to put their previous road struggles behind them.  But, as is apparently the custom in visiting ballparks this season, the pitching staff gave the lead right back.  Rookie Anthony Swarzak suddenly couldn’t find the strike zone, walking Matt Holliday and Jason Giambi on eight pitches.  He then hit Aaron Cunningham right in the head (who stayed in the game, though he suffered a concussion) and surrendered a three-run double. His night was over when he walked Orlando Cabrera, and failed to make it out of the fourth inning for a second consecutive start.  In his defense, he seems genuinely frustrated by his struggles, but it’s clear that he isn’t quite ready to pitch at the major-league level.  Once Glen Perkins comes off the DL, Swarzak will likely be sent back to AAA.  It’s unlikely he’d even earn a spot in the bullpen with the control issues he’s had.

  • Is Justin Morneau in a slump?

Thumbnail image for morneau-j-cp-090309-306.jpgFour games is a small sample size, but it certainly seems to be the case.  He struggled in Seattle, going 1-for-11 and chasing pitches well outside the strike zone.  He also went 0-for-4 in Oakland last night, striking out three times, twice looking.  And while it’s true that the Twins have faced three left-handed starters in a row, this shouldn’t be much of a problem for Morny.  He’s always hit lefties pretty well, but this season he’s been murdering them, batting .380/..406/.663 with an OPS of 1.069 compared to .292/.409/.585 and a .993 OPS against righties.  Morny appears to be pressing at the plate, and considering that he’s played in every single game this year, it’s possible that he just needs a day off.  Michael Cuddyer and Brian Buscher might not be the greatest fill-ins at first base, but a slumping Morneau isn’t doing the team much good right now, either.

Tonight:  I’ll just be happy if Scott Baker has a second consecutive quality start.  The Twins have been waiting for their #1 and #2 starters to consistently pitch well all season, especially on the road.  Of course, a win would be even better, but I fear that’s asking too much. 

Because Other People Write Better Than I Do: Link Dump

The Twins open a four-game series against the A’s tonight in Fremont Oakland.  There’s a pretty good scouting report on the White Elephants here.  I’d like to believe the Twins will take the series (really I do), but the way things have been going lately, they’ll probably be lucky to avoid being swept.

It’s no secret that the Twinkies have had trouble scoring runs outside the teflon confines of the Metrodome.  At least now we know why.

Tom Glavine isn’t happy that the Braves released him, and is considering suing to recover the $1 million signing bonus he would have received if he made the active roster.  I guess it’s understandable that Atlanta would rather give its most prized pitching prospect a job instead of a 43-year-old with arm problems (especially since his performance has been less-than-stellar the past couple of seasons), but one has to wonder why they even bothered to re-sign Glavine in the first place.

Glen Perkins was roughed up in his first rehab start, surrendering five runs on six hits, including a couple of home runs, in four innings.  So he’s basically picking right up where he left off before going on the DL.  Um. so how healthy is Glavine, then?

The Nats are planning shell out big bucks to sign this year’s can’t-miss pitching prospect Stephen Strasburg in the first round.  Will Strasburg be the one to save the franchise from itself?  Of course not, this is the Nats.  They can’t do anything rightNot even fireworks.

Speaking of can’t-miss prospects, Alan Schwarz notes that there really is no such thing.  At least not where pitching prospects are concerned.

I am a huge hockey fan.  I should be excited about the Stanley Cup Finals.  But watching Detroit (probably) win its second consecutive cup, and 12th in team history, is just sort of anticlimactic.  At least we get some good Jersey Fouls out of it.

Offensive Explosion

  • Twins hit four homers against O’s

morny_homer.jpgThe Twins teed off on Baltimore yesterday, bashing four home runs.  Justin Morneau hit his second dinger in as many games, a two-run shot off of Jeremy Guthrie in the first.  Brendan Harris, Matt Tolbert(!) and Delmon Young all homered off of Adam Eaton in the sixth, though the wind did help out a little bit (except for Brendan Harris’ rocket off of the Walgreen’s sign in left field, and Morny’s laser to center).  And while nobody homered in today’s contest against the Marlins, the offense managed to produce eight runs on twelve hits.  Starter Kevin Slowey had two hits and three RBI of his own, while shutting down the Fish for five innings (his lone run was a Dan Uggla solo shot).   

The Twins have now scored 29 runs in their past four games.  While some readers thought that I was just being negative when I complained about the lack of offense, it turns out that a little tough love is what the guys really needed.  You’re welcome.

  • Chicago pounds Oakland, 20-5

Kyle Orton threw two touchdown passes, and Chicago added a couple of field goals on their way to a rout of Oakland.  The Raiders couldn’t solve the Bears’ stifling D, and only managed to score a field goal and a safety.

Seriously, though, this has to be the ugliest boxscore ever.   Paul Bako had four hits and three RBI even though he didn’t come in until the sixth inning.  Oakland reliever Edgar Gonzalez barfed up seven earned runs in 2/3 of an inning, giving him a 94.50 ERA for the day.  Andrew Bailey was the only Oakland pitcher who managed to toss a scoreless inning.   

  • Japan defeats Korea, 5-3 to repeat as WBC champs

japan_wbc_champs.jpgI’m not going to lie, I fell asleep on the couch in the bottom of the eighth and didn’t get to see how the game ended.  I can’t help it, I was tired!  And it looked like Japan pretty much had this one in the bag, anyway.  Luckily the good people at Ghostrunner on First were paying attention, so I didn’t have to.  While I think that the tournament has its flaws (the timing is wrong, the formatting should be better, etc.) these games have to be some of the most exciting I’ve seen in a long time.  After being deprived of baseball for four long months, it just felt really good to have that had all of the excitement and intensity of playoff matches.  In March!  Four years just seems way too long to wait for more.

  • But what if you don’t really want either one?

The geniuses in the St. Paul Saints‘ public relations department have dreamed up another brilliant promotional scheme.  These are, after all, the same people who came up with the Larry Craig bobble foot doll (in honor of National Tap Dance Day, of course):

bobble_foot_doll_2.jpgIn honor of Minnesota’s never-ending Senate recount, the Saints created the “Re” Count bobble head doll:

recount.jpgHe’s modeled after Count von Count of Sesame Street fame:

The “Re” Count doll will be distributed to the first 2,500 fans on May 23, prior to a game against the Sioux Falls Canaries.  Hopefully this whole thing will be over with by then.  But I wouldn’t count on it.

Why am I a Twins fan?

p1.kirby.puckett.3.si.jpgScott over at I’m Not a Headline Guy wrote a lovely entry explaining his devotion to the New York Yankees.  And it got me to thinking about my beloved Twinkies, and, well, why they’re my beloved Twinkies.  Of course, a lot of it has to do with the 1987 World Series, which I am just barely old enough to remember.  Nobody expected the ’87 Twins to win it all, and with good reason I might add.  They finished with a mediocre 85-77 record, which was good enough to win the weak AL West division, but was the worst winning percentage of any playoff-bound team in history (a record that would stand until the 83-78 Cardinals won it all in 2006).  The 98-64 Detroit Tigers were heavily favored to win the AL pennant, with most analysts predicting a sweep of the supposedly hapless Twins.  Instead it was the Twins who nearly pulled off a sweep of their own, beating the Tigers four games to one to clinch the ALCS and advance to the World Series for the first time since 1965.  Once again, the Twinkies were up against a heavily-favored opponent in the St. Louis Cardinals, who were about to make their third World Series appearance in six years.  And once again the Twins would pull off a stunning upset, beating the Cards in seven games and clinching their first World Series title since moving to Minnesota in 1961 (and second in team history).  Frank Viola, Kirby Puckett, Dan Gladden, Gary Gaetti, all those guys on that team would become great heroes in Minnesota sports history.

And then there was the ’91 World Series, the greatest World Series of all-time.  This Series had everything:  dramatic walk-off home runs, fantastic pitching performances from youngsters Tom Glavine and John Smoltz and veteran Jack Morris, wrestling (Braves fans still haven’t quite gotten over that one), a new MLB record for extra-innings WS games, and two teams that had finished in last place in their respective divisions the previous season.  This time around the Twins weren’t exactly considered underdogs, having finished the regular season with a 95-67 record.  They steamrolled over the Blue Jays in the ALCS, winning four games to one on the way to their second World Series title in four years. 

The Braves would prove to be a much more challenging opponent, however, and the Twins would have to grind out five one-run games and three extra-innings games before clinching the title.  The most dramatic game of the series, however, had to be game six.  The Twins were facing elimination, having dropped three straight games to Atlanta, including a 14-5 blowout in game five.  The Twins took a 3-2 lead into the seventh inning, when Atlanta 2B Mark Lemke scored on a fielder’s choice with the bases loaded to tie the game.  The score remained even until the bottom of the eleventh, when Kirby Puckett untied the game with a solo shot off of Charlie Leibrandt to left-center field.  That shot, and Jack Buck’s now-famous call, has to be the single greatest moment of my entire childhood.  The Twins would go on to win game seven in ten innings, with a walk-off bloop single by Gene Larkin.  Jack Morris pitched a ten-inning masterpiece (yes, you read that right, ten innings) in that game, which to this day is one of the best pitching performances I’ve ever seen.  Good times.

There’s been a lot of other good stuff since then, too.  The 2002 team was amazingly talented, and looked like they were going to bring us another championship.  Alas, it was not to be.  The Angels made sure of that.  The 2006 team made an incredible late-season run to win the division. Unfortunately that was as far as the Twinkies would go, as they would then get swept by Oakland in the ALDS.  They really got under Ozzie Guillen’s skin that year, too.  That’s always fun.

And of course, there’s this guy:

Thumbnail image for mauer.jpgCome on, admit it.  You know you love him.  Even if you aren’t a Twins fan.

  •  I love the Wild, too, even though I complain about them a lot

Hockey in Minnesota is like hockey in Canada.  Or football in Texas.  It’s just what you do.  It’s what we’re good at.  If your hockey team has any Americans on it, chances are pretty good that they’re from Minnesota.  Or that they once played for the Golden Gophers.  I started off as a North Stars fan when I was a little kid.  They weren’t very good for the most part, though they did make a run for the Cup in 1991.  But then a very bad man decided to move the team to Dallas after the 1992 season.  I was heartbroken.  I cried like a little girl (of course, I was a little girl, but that’s beside the point).  And I was also torn.  I wanted to cheer for my Stars, even though they weren’t really my Stars anymore, because they took Mike Modano with them.  And I loved him.  But, like any other bitter divorce, the animosity I felt for my ex-team was too great and I just couldn’t get over it.  I couldn’t bring myself to cheer for any other NHL team either.  It just didn’t seem right.  I was a die-hard hockey fan without a team.

So I decided to fill the hockey void in my life with my hometown Gophers.  I mean, they’ve done some good things:

It just wasn’t the same as having a professional hockey team, though.  So when the NHL granted Minnesota an expansion franchise to open for the 2000-2001 season, I was absolutely thrilled.  Though I wasn’t crazy about the team name (what the heck’s a wild?), or the logo (or the home unis, blech), I was excited to have an NHL franchise back in Minnesota.  And though the team itself hasn’t exactly lived up to expectations, it’s been better than most of the old North Stars teams.  And we have new heroes now:

  • I root for the Vikings, and to a lesser extent, the Wolves, too

Tarvaris-Jackson-001.jpgWhy? Because somebody has to, that’s why.  Oh there was a time when the Vikings were good.  The Vikings of the late ’60s and early ’70s were some of the best football teams to never win a championship, but that was before my time.  I remember the 1998 Vikes, though I’ve spent the past ten years trying to forget the NFC Championship game.  And the current team is actually pretty good, it’s just missing a few key pieces.  Like a starting QB.  And special teams that can, um, not give up so many touchdowns (I mean really, when your punter is trying to make a tackle you know you’re in trouble).  And some decent play-calling (which, by the way, helps out the starting QB a lot).

I’m not a huge basketball fan, but I do have a soft spot for the Timberwolves.  I kind of feel sorry for them because they suck so bad.  It’s not their fault, they’ve been mismanaged for years.  And before Al Jefferson went down they had a pretty good shot at being a mediocre team this year.  At least they aren’t the worst team in the league, so there’s that.